Archive for the ‘kuwait’ Category

Do your part – Donate blood   Leave a comment

As you are reading this, a child in hospital is receiving a blood transfusion. A girl is learning how to smile again, as she recovers from leukaemia. In another ward, an old man is being treated for severe burns.

hey all rely on blood donation from healthy people like you…

You could be investing in your own future as well as saving someone’s life, Because who knows if you or one of your friends or family will need a blood transfusion one day? God forbid.

Who can become a donor?
Practically anyone, as long as you’re over 18, under 60 and in good health.

What blood groups are needed?
All groups, especially the most common which we can never have enough of.

Where can I give blood?
The main collection facility is Central Blood Bank in Jabriya, as well as its four fixed satellite branches distributed in different areas in Kuwait, Amiri Hospital, Adan hospital, Jahra hospital and the Red Crescent Society.

How long does it take?
The donation actually takes ten to fifteen minutes, but the whole process, takes about thirty five minutes from registration to the end of the rest period.

How is it done?
There are three steps:

1. First Step
We must first make sure you are fit enough to give blood, and that giving blood will cause you no harm. We also have to make sure your blood will be safe for the patient who’ll receive it. That is why we will check your blood and ask you to complete a health questionnaire with the help of one of our doctors or nurses.

2. The Questionnaire
After a few quick questions, a registered health care professional, -a doctor or a nurse will  ask about your health. Your answers will be treated in the strictest confidence. They are routine enquiries which must be made for all volunteers before their donation is accepted.

If you don’t qualify as a donor this time, we will explain why and give you all the advice you need. If you do qualify we will ask you to sign that you are happy for us to test your blood later in the laboratory, the test will tell us your blood group and will screen for any infection that may be transmitted in blood such as hepatitis viruses (which cause jaundice) and human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV); if any of these positive tests shows you cannot became a donor, we will explain why and give you all the advice you need in the strictest confidence.

3. Haemoglobin Screening
Do not worry that giving blood could affect your own health.  We will only collect blood from those who can spare it!  All volunteers are screened to ensure that a donation will not  make them anaemic. This is done by collecting a tiny drop of blood from your finger, the test may show that you cannot spare a full donation on that day. If so, we will tell you what you should do.

Honestly, does it hurt?
Giving blood is normally quick and painless. After haemoglobin screening you’ll be settled on a bed with a band wrapped around your upper arm. The skin on the inside of your elbow will then be thoroughly cleaned.

Next, the band will be tightened just enough to make the veins stand out. A sterile needle is inserted to collect your blood. Most donors are pleasantly surprised at just how soon it’s all over. In about five to ten minutes we’ll have collected 450ml (about a pint). Firm pressure is applied as the needle comes out and a light dressing is placed on the arm once bleeding has stopped.

Is there any risk?
All donations are taken by trained staff. These staff never work without the supervision of a doctor or nurse. Every piece of equipment used is sterile and never used again. There’s no risk of a donor becoming infected in any way.

A very small number of donors sometimes feel a little hot or faint after giving blood, or experience minor bruising where the needle went in, but this is rare and is not generally a cause for concern.

What will I get out of giving blood?
Health screening tests: Every donor undergoes a physical, medical and laboratory
check up, where the blood is screened for all transmittable diseases such as hepatitis B and C HTLV, HIV, malaria and syphilis.

Headache relief:  A number of donors have a higher number of red cells than the normal for natural reasons which increases the viscosity of blood and therefore creates a headache. Donating blood will relieve this symptom.

High blood pressure:  Donating blood will help to reduce the high blood pressure, providing that you do not suffer any complication such as heart diseases.

Helping others: Becoming a donor is an act that benefits many. It is a way of helping others less fortunate than ourselves in our community.

Life after all is the greatest gift that a person can give.

Heart trouble:  Research proved without any doubt that incidents of heart diseases between donors are less than non donors.

Knowing that one has helped in saving someone’s life can give the individual a great feeling of satisfaction and this is a reward in itself.

Source

Posted January 18, 2012 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, happiness, i love you, idea, Jai Ho, kuwait, life, lifestyle

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Send SMS when driving to meet GOD   Leave a comment

Yup that what happenned to  Emirati footballer Diab Awana, who according to his friend Hamdan Al Kamali, was on the phone with him minutes before his car crashed into a lorry, causing his death.

This not a very strange sight in Kuwait, rather a norm (either talking or texting on phone).

The accidents are never tied or related to the mobiles, specially when one knows that over 50% of the cause in the mobile.

Can sense prevail among the drivers in Kuwait or are they very eager to meet GOD?

Source

Posted September 28, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in crazy, faux pas, kuwait

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3% alcohol endangering the lives of citizens and residents of Kuwait   1 comment

The Arabtimes, Kuwait, today reported:

“The Criminal Evidence Department has submitted a report to the Cassation Court, stating that a certain brand of mayonnaise available at a cooperative society contains three percent alcohol, reports Annahar daily.
The company which imported the mayonnaise has been charged with endangering the lives of citizens and residents as it did not properly examine the ingredients of the product. Sources say the cooperative society which sold the product too has been charged in the case.”

Well, if 3% alcohol can endanger the lives of the citizens of Kuwait, maybe the investigation report should be sent across to UAE, Oman, Qatar & Bahrain; so that their brothers from the other GCC citizens can learn from it and take effective measures to stop alcohol sale.

Wonder what a detrimental effect ‘it’ must be having on the citizens of other countries?

Posted August 22, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, crazy, faux pas, kuwait

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Ramadan v/s Productive Muslims   Leave a comment

We were taught that work is worship. If you do your work and duties promptly and in the right manner, it is equivalent to prayer.

But my perception (rather most of those living in the Arab World) of Ramadan is that this is a time when people (since they are fasting) take it as an excuse to shy away from work and show anger to those who make them work. Why?

Mohammad Faris, CEO and founder of Productive Muslims, said that history teaches us Ramadan was a time of great achievement and industry.

“If we look into history, we learn that Ramadan was a productive time for the Ummah.

It is in this noble month that many great events occurred in the history of Islam like the victory of faith over disbelief in the Battle of Badr, the conquest of Makkah, Battle of ‘Ayn Jaaloot and other decisive battles,” Faris told Gulf News from his Jeddah offices in Saudi Arabia.

“This indicates that there are many lessons of success to draw on from this month in the history of Islamic civilisation. In a similar manner, Ramadan is a time where Muslims must fight their own inner battles to gain victory of becoming better Muslims and more productive in order to have success in this life and the next.”

Those who are observing Ramadan must work to dispel stereotypes through personal goals of becoming more productive, he said.

“Unfortunately, Ramadan today is being accused of being an ‘unproductive’ month by many Muslim — and non-Muslim — employers working in the Muslim world.

“This misrepresentation of Ramadan is highlighted by the actions of some Muslims who unfortunately use Ramadan as an excuse to be lazy, not get work done, and follow unproductive habits such as staying up all night at cafes and restaurants, thus feeling sleepy during working hours.

“This is very important, as there are many sincere employees who want to work hard and be productive during Ramadan, but do not have the techniques or skills to do so consistently,” Faris said.

“Businesses could arrange workshops with Muslim productivity experts to help their employees or they can encourage their employees to sign up to online courses that specialise in this sort of training.”

Businesses must also adopt a co-operative approach with workers to ensure that deadlines are met and production does not slip.

‘Zero tolerance’

“Second, businesses need to encourage a resilient mindset among their fasting employees, for example, a mindset that whether it’s Ramadan or not Ramadan, work has to get done and employees need to find a way to keep up with the work pace,” he said.

“There should be zero tolerance to people who use Ramadan as an excuse for being lazy or unproductive, and signs of unproductivity or people using Ramadan as an excuse for being unproductive should be stamped out or rebuked publicly.”

To help workers help themselves, Productive Muslims offers a ist for a more productive Ramadan:

1. Have sincere intentions and work hard for an ultimate productive Ramadan.

2. Plan each day of Ramadan the night before. Choose three important tasks you want to achieve the next day and record them in your diary.

3. Never EVER miss Suhour, wake up at least an hour before Fajr and have a filling, balanced meal.

4. Start working on your most important tasks right after Fajr and get at least one or two done.

5. Try to take an afternoon nap, not more than 20 minutes, either just before or after Dhuhur.

6. Plan your Ramadan days (and life) around Salah times, not the other way round.

7. Block at least one hour for reciting the Quran each day.

8. End your fast with dates and milk or water, go to Maghreb prayers, then come back for a light meal.

9. Give lots of ‘physical sadaqah’; get involved in organising community iftars, charity drives, helping orphans etc. Earn rewards working for others.

10. Don’t miss an opportunity for Dawah. When someone asks you why you’re not eating, give them a beautiful explanation of Ramadan and Islam.

Posted August 14, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in kuwait, lifestyle, religion

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RAMADAN KAREEM to all believers of Islam   1 comment

Time to patch-up
Time to let go of your egos
Time to smile
Time to celebrate
Time to fast
Time to binge
Time for everything…


The head of the Dubai Police has said that courtesy and discretion will be the watchword as his department gears up to enforce Ramadan regulations across the emirate.
“We train our officers how to deal with different nationalities and to respect non-Muslims who may inadvertently offend Muslims during Ramadan by eating, drinking or smoking in public places during the day,” Lieutenant General Dahi Khalfan Tamim told Arabian Business.
“We show them that these things happen, and they are to deal with it in a courteous way so that they would refrain from doing it again.”


Can the non-Muslims expect a similar courtesy in Kuwait, specially considerting that it is summer time and temperatures cross 50 deg and that not everyone’s body can sustain such abstinence for long?

Posted July 31, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, kuwait, muslim, religion

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The Arab Tsunami   2 comments

The Arab Tsunami started a couple of months before the one that struck Japan. The one in Japan was a natural calamity, but the one in the Arab region was man-made.

Not that the world was unaware to the long simmering across the region. What they did not anticipate was the acceleration and momentum of the rebellion that it created.

Well, the street vendor from Tunisia can be considered as the small wave that started the Arab Tsunami, the repercussions of which were felt across the Arab world.

The Internet, via, FaceBook, Twitter & YouTube just added the much needed support within the timeframe, in order to create that ‘moving’ force.

This rebellion by the populace is against the suppression of the aspirations on civilians, particularly the youth. This suppression is by the government spearheaded by the ruler, be it a monarch or an autocrat; some of which have succumbed to the rebellion demands (some by pressure & some by being extra-charitable overnight), while the defiant still continue to uncomfortable on their “thorny” thrones.

The Arab Tsunami threatens roll some more dictatorial and “possibly” some monarch heads; if they are not flexible enough to accede to the demands of the civilian population. It is a well known fact that during the thunderstorm even the mighty oak falls, but the humble grass stays on.

Hence, there is a desperate need to change the mindset of the Arab rulers, if the region has to survive peacefully and see some radical growth, in line with the world. Just waking up with a philanthropical thought after the catastrophe, is not going to resolve, defuse or bridge the gap between the ruler and the ruled. It has to be inclusive growth in line with the aspirations of all the strata of the society.

Those rulers directly in the “line-of-fire” are doing their bit to assuage the fire; but it a fact that their other peers are not immune to such uprisings.

It is said that Western world is being very selective and disparate in their responses to these uprising Arab Tsunami. They have been blamed for their “double standards” in dealing with such situations from across  the world. They are considering their selfish interests in giving their support to this situation.

The tsunami has already swept across Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, Yemen, Syria, Bahrain, & Libya.

So one may ask, “Who’s next”? Change is inevitable. Its not if, but when?

 

Kuwait 50/20/5 celebrations   3 comments

WE JOIN ALL THE KUWAITIS IN THE CELEBRATION OF THE ANNIVERSARY OF KUWAIT 50TH YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE AND THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE LIBERATION AND THE 5TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ASCENDANCE OF H.H THE AMIR TO THE LEADERSHIP OF THE STATE OF KUWAIT

LONG LIVE KUWAIT

 

 

WE JOIN ALL THE KUWAITIS IN THE CELEBRATION OF THE ANNIVERSARY OF KUWAIT 50TH YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE AND THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE LIBERATION AND THE 5TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ASCENDANCE OF H.H THE AMIR TO THE LEADERSHIP OF THE STATE OF KUWAIT

LONG LIVE KUWAIT

WE JOIN ALL THE KUWAITIS IN THE CELEBRATION OF THE ANNIVERSARY OF KUWAIT 50TH YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE AND THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE LIBERATION AND THE 5TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ASCENDANCE OF H.H THE AMIR TO THE LEADERSHIP OF THE STATE OF KUWAIT

LONG LIVE KUWAIT

 

Posted February 24, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in kuwait

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