Archive for the ‘idea’ Category

Do your part – Donate blood   Leave a comment

As you are reading this, a child in hospital is receiving a blood transfusion. A girl is learning how to smile again, as she recovers from leukaemia. In another ward, an old man is being treated for severe burns.

hey all rely on blood donation from healthy people like you…

You could be investing in your own future as well as saving someone’s life, Because who knows if you or one of your friends or family will need a blood transfusion one day? God forbid.

Who can become a donor?
Practically anyone, as long as you’re over 18, under 60 and in good health.

What blood groups are needed?
All groups, especially the most common which we can never have enough of.

Where can I give blood?
The main collection facility is Central Blood Bank in Jabriya, as well as its four fixed satellite branches distributed in different areas in Kuwait, Amiri Hospital, Adan hospital, Jahra hospital and the Red Crescent Society.

How long does it take?
The donation actually takes ten to fifteen minutes, but the whole process, takes about thirty five minutes from registration to the end of the rest period.

How is it done?
There are three steps:

1. First Step
We must first make sure you are fit enough to give blood, and that giving blood will cause you no harm. We also have to make sure your blood will be safe for the patient who’ll receive it. That is why we will check your blood and ask you to complete a health questionnaire with the help of one of our doctors or nurses.

2. The Questionnaire
After a few quick questions, a registered health care professional, -a doctor or a nurse will  ask about your health. Your answers will be treated in the strictest confidence. They are routine enquiries which must be made for all volunteers before their donation is accepted.

If you don’t qualify as a donor this time, we will explain why and give you all the advice you need. If you do qualify we will ask you to sign that you are happy for us to test your blood later in the laboratory, the test will tell us your blood group and will screen for any infection that may be transmitted in blood such as hepatitis viruses (which cause jaundice) and human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV); if any of these positive tests shows you cannot became a donor, we will explain why and give you all the advice you need in the strictest confidence.

3. Haemoglobin Screening
Do not worry that giving blood could affect your own health.  We will only collect blood from those who can spare it!  All volunteers are screened to ensure that a donation will not  make them anaemic. This is done by collecting a tiny drop of blood from your finger, the test may show that you cannot spare a full donation on that day. If so, we will tell you what you should do.

Honestly, does it hurt?
Giving blood is normally quick and painless. After haemoglobin screening you’ll be settled on a bed with a band wrapped around your upper arm. The skin on the inside of your elbow will then be thoroughly cleaned.

Next, the band will be tightened just enough to make the veins stand out. A sterile needle is inserted to collect your blood. Most donors are pleasantly surprised at just how soon it’s all over. In about five to ten minutes we’ll have collected 450ml (about a pint). Firm pressure is applied as the needle comes out and a light dressing is placed on the arm once bleeding has stopped.

Is there any risk?
All donations are taken by trained staff. These staff never work without the supervision of a doctor or nurse. Every piece of equipment used is sterile and never used again. There’s no risk of a donor becoming infected in any way.

A very small number of donors sometimes feel a little hot or faint after giving blood, or experience minor bruising where the needle went in, but this is rare and is not generally a cause for concern.

What will I get out of giving blood?
Health screening tests: Every donor undergoes a physical, medical and laboratory
check up, where the blood is screened for all transmittable diseases such as hepatitis B and C HTLV, HIV, malaria and syphilis.

Headache relief:  A number of donors have a higher number of red cells than the normal for natural reasons which increases the viscosity of blood and therefore creates a headache. Donating blood will relieve this symptom.

High blood pressure:  Donating blood will help to reduce the high blood pressure, providing that you do not suffer any complication such as heart diseases.

Helping others: Becoming a donor is an act that benefits many. It is a way of helping others less fortunate than ourselves in our community.

Life after all is the greatest gift that a person can give.

Heart trouble:  Research proved without any doubt that incidents of heart diseases between donors are less than non donors.

Knowing that one has helped in saving someone’s life can give the individual a great feeling of satisfaction and this is a reward in itself.

Source

Posted January 18, 2012 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, happiness, i love you, idea, Jai Ho, kuwait, life, lifestyle

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Organ donation dogma?   Leave a comment

Why is this fascination for the dead body? After all, everybody dies.

Death is inevitable (perhaps the only one).

So what happens when a person dies?

According to various religions, there are rituals performed to bid goodbye to that person.

Cremation, burial, burning or even leaving the body to feast upon for the vultures.

But why do we not think of utlilizing the body for the good of the other fellow human being. There are many ways in which a body can be utlilized, so as to benefit the others.

Organ donation, eye donation, giving it to colleges for students to learn.

Well the best form to live, even after your death is to donate your organs for the sake of other. This has to endorsed by you and religiously followed by your relatives in a timely manner.

No other form of donation can equal this gesture.

So why is religion coming in the way of the benevolent gesture? Is it not the duty of the religiious leaders to to advocate this practice. After all, you are giving away something that is no longer useful to you.

The religious preachers, rather than ridicule it in the name of religion, should rather preach on this life giving gesture.

Let better sense prevail. AMEN !!!

Posted October 18, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, happiness, i love you, idea, loved ones, muslim, religion

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Mobile operators will lose voice services to mobile platforms   Leave a comment

Imagine buying your SIM-free mobile phone from a local electronics store and logging into your Google or Apple account as soon as you turn the phone on for the first time. Then imagine having the phone ready to use for voice calls with a phone number provided to you by Google Talk or Skype, and ready to access email, YouTube or Facebook.

That same phone automatically hooks to your home Wi-Fi or any of the available 3G, WiMax or LTE networks without you even knowing (or caring) which specific network its running on at the moment. No longer do you have to belong to a specific carrier — your phone automatically picks the strongest and cheapest network option at any given time. Your network access, along with voice, app/in-app purchases and everything else are provided to you by the mobile platform provider. The carriers are only there to run network infrastructure and sell bandwidth to two to three mobile platform providers.

Let’s face it, the only two things that still connect carriers to consumers are the voice number and billing for the network access. SIM card technology is rudimentary — you can easily conduct user authentication using a simple login, just like Apple does on iPods when you want to buy apps or songs from the iTunes store.

Looking into the future, even the phone number itself will disappear. Why bother with all these numbers when you can just place a call directly to anybody’s Facebook profile?

This future is inevitable, and the changes are coming very soon. With mobile platform providers running the show today, carriers simply have no way of stopping the process. Not having any control over the platform vendors — for instance, via a consortium that would centrally license Android or other mobile platforms to equalize the balance of power between the platform provider and the carriers/OEMs — they will eventually give up on their ambitions to control the user. Just read the Google/Motorola/Skyhook story to see how it happens.

It only takes one carrier to crack and start selling bandwidth to Google, Microsoft or Apple; all other carriers will simply have no choice but to follow. It’s like the prisoners’ dilemma from economic textbooks: If both prisoners don’t talk, both win. But if separated and one is promised a way out (or an easier sentence) and he talks first, then game theory suggests the winning strategy for each prisoner is to talk. In other words, one of them will crack. They are nowhere close to being united enough to stand together, even in the short to mid-term. Look how effortlessly Apple, then everyone else, took over their app distribution businesses — something that only five years ago would have been totally unthinkable.

Most likely, these first-to-crack carriers will be tier-two low-cost carriers outside the U.S., possibly acquired by, but likely just partnering with, the big platform players. Those carriers will have a high incentive to enter such partnerships, as their networks are already optimized for low costs (lean, efficient cost structure without heavy marketing, support, premium services overheads, better network logistics, etc.). Short to mid-term, the strategy will be against tier-one carriers, who have a high marketing/operations cost burden. The UK actually looks like a very logical place to start, especially when some UK carriers have already been experimenting with Skype phones, which were successful to the degree that price-sensitive younger audiences actually started to carry Skype phones as their second device.

It will probably be a while before most users fully switch to non-carrier-provided voice/network services — maybe five to seven years — but it’s only a matter of time, as the new model is so much more compelling to the consumer. Signing up for multiple phone numbers as easily as opening email accounts, getting the best and the cheapest network at any given time in any spot (finally, no more service drops!), free and unlimited voice/video on WiFi networks, cheap roaming even when overseas on a local service, and so many more benefits are poised to take off.

Once this happens, carriers fall into a very undesirable position. Network access becomes an absolute commodity, much more so than in the case of landline ISPs. The latter at least have relatively high switching costs, while a mobile phone is already connected to every network available in its physical location. This means carriers compete head to head over who sells the cheapest bandwidth to Google, Apple or Microsoft, and only those most economically fit with the strongest network logistics survive in the game. This time, the brand, handset subsidies or any other marketing tricks are of no help — it’s all about economics.

What’s really interesting is what could happen with next-generation networks. As carriers see their margins disappear almost entirely and the profits shift to mobile platforms, operators won’t accumulate enough profits to be able to invest in next-generation networks. Nor does the marginalized economics of the network business promise them high ROI. Mobile platforms do the opposite: By that time, they’ll have accumulated profits for all the value-added services, so they’ll have both the money to invest and the strong economic incentive to do so. This will also be very lucrative to mobile platforms politically, as owning services end to end, from cloud to network to devices, enables a whole new level of control and market power.

by Ilja Laurs is CEO at GetJar

Posted September 12, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in facebook, freedom, google, idea, internet, lifestyle, technology

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Horsemaning – the new Planking   Leave a comment

Keeping up with internet meme and internet fads will now find you looking at Horsemaning sometimes spelled as Horsemanning. On the new Facebook page dedicated to this new fad is found the description. So What is Horsemaning? ‘Horsemaning started in the 1920s and is basically a fake beheading, where people lies down with the head hidden and another person hides behind the same object leaving the head exposed. It was started by a member from Buzzfeed and has now become the new planking. After planking there have been a couple of internet trends and fads trying to become the new planking like Batting and Owling but could this be the new planking.

Posted August 11, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in crazy, faux pas, idea, photos

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Aviiq Portable Charging Station for Apple products   Leave a comment

Neat little portable pack for charging all Apple products while on the move.

Aviiq’s new Portable Charging Station -acts as a sort of USB hub in a bag, this little black travel sleeve lets you pack and power three USB devices — even an iPad — with one outlet. What’s more, the station allows for easy syncing by way of a retractable USB port.
Cost – $80
Found at Engadget

Posted July 28, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in apple, crazy, idea, lifestyle, music, technology

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CD that turns into a mouse   Leave a comment

Can’t do without a mouse, but the laptop finger touchpad mouse is irritating? Conventional mouse is too bulky to carry around?

Well, how you put your CD-convertible-mouse into your CD drive?

Posted July 24, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in crazy, design, idea

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Cut T-shirt style fashion by Adam Saak   Leave a comment

Hey lady? Are you game for this “Cut T-shirt” fashion trend?

 

Daring to try it out? Go ahead.

Posted July 21, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in fashion, faux pas, idea

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