Archive for the ‘happiness’ Category

Do your part – Donate blood   Leave a comment

As you are reading this, a child in hospital is receiving a blood transfusion. A girl is learning how to smile again, as she recovers from leukaemia. In another ward, an old man is being treated for severe burns.

hey all rely on blood donation from healthy people like you…

You could be investing in your own future as well as saving someone’s life, Because who knows if you or one of your friends or family will need a blood transfusion one day? God forbid.

Who can become a donor?
Practically anyone, as long as you’re over 18, under 60 and in good health.

What blood groups are needed?
All groups, especially the most common which we can never have enough of.

Where can I give blood?
The main collection facility is Central Blood Bank in Jabriya, as well as its four fixed satellite branches distributed in different areas in Kuwait, Amiri Hospital, Adan hospital, Jahra hospital and the Red Crescent Society.

How long does it take?
The donation actually takes ten to fifteen minutes, but the whole process, takes about thirty five minutes from registration to the end of the rest period.

How is it done?
There are three steps:

1. First Step
We must first make sure you are fit enough to give blood, and that giving blood will cause you no harm. We also have to make sure your blood will be safe for the patient who’ll receive it. That is why we will check your blood and ask you to complete a health questionnaire with the help of one of our doctors or nurses.

2. The Questionnaire
After a few quick questions, a registered health care professional, -a doctor or a nurse will  ask about your health. Your answers will be treated in the strictest confidence. They are routine enquiries which must be made for all volunteers before their donation is accepted.

If you don’t qualify as a donor this time, we will explain why and give you all the advice you need. If you do qualify we will ask you to sign that you are happy for us to test your blood later in the laboratory, the test will tell us your blood group and will screen for any infection that may be transmitted in blood such as hepatitis viruses (which cause jaundice) and human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV); if any of these positive tests shows you cannot became a donor, we will explain why and give you all the advice you need in the strictest confidence.

3. Haemoglobin Screening
Do not worry that giving blood could affect your own health.  We will only collect blood from those who can spare it!  All volunteers are screened to ensure that a donation will not  make them anaemic. This is done by collecting a tiny drop of blood from your finger, the test may show that you cannot spare a full donation on that day. If so, we will tell you what you should do.

Honestly, does it hurt?
Giving blood is normally quick and painless. After haemoglobin screening you’ll be settled on a bed with a band wrapped around your upper arm. The skin on the inside of your elbow will then be thoroughly cleaned.

Next, the band will be tightened just enough to make the veins stand out. A sterile needle is inserted to collect your blood. Most donors are pleasantly surprised at just how soon it’s all over. In about five to ten minutes we’ll have collected 450ml (about a pint). Firm pressure is applied as the needle comes out and a light dressing is placed on the arm once bleeding has stopped.

Is there any risk?
All donations are taken by trained staff. These staff never work without the supervision of a doctor or nurse. Every piece of equipment used is sterile and never used again. There’s no risk of a donor becoming infected in any way.

A very small number of donors sometimes feel a little hot or faint after giving blood, or experience minor bruising where the needle went in, but this is rare and is not generally a cause for concern.

What will I get out of giving blood?
Health screening tests: Every donor undergoes a physical, medical and laboratory
check up, where the blood is screened for all transmittable diseases such as hepatitis B and C HTLV, HIV, malaria and syphilis.

Headache relief:  A number of donors have a higher number of red cells than the normal for natural reasons which increases the viscosity of blood and therefore creates a headache. Donating blood will relieve this symptom.

High blood pressure:  Donating blood will help to reduce the high blood pressure, providing that you do not suffer any complication such as heart diseases.

Helping others: Becoming a donor is an act that benefits many. It is a way of helping others less fortunate than ourselves in our community.

Life after all is the greatest gift that a person can give.

Heart trouble:  Research proved without any doubt that incidents of heart diseases between donors are less than non donors.

Knowing that one has helped in saving someone’s life can give the individual a great feeling of satisfaction and this is a reward in itself.

Source

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Posted January 18, 2012 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, happiness, i love you, idea, Jai Ho, kuwait, life, lifestyle

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Organ donation dogma?   Leave a comment

Why is this fascination for the dead body? After all, everybody dies.

Death is inevitable (perhaps the only one).

So what happens when a person dies?

According to various religions, there are rituals performed to bid goodbye to that person.

Cremation, burial, burning or even leaving the body to feast upon for the vultures.

But why do we not think of utlilizing the body for the good of the other fellow human being. There are many ways in which a body can be utlilized, so as to benefit the others.

Organ donation, eye donation, giving it to colleges for students to learn.

Well the best form to live, even after your death is to donate your organs for the sake of other. This has to endorsed by you and religiously followed by your relatives in a timely manner.

No other form of donation can equal this gesture.

So why is religion coming in the way of the benevolent gesture? Is it not the duty of the religiious leaders to to advocate this practice. After all, you are giving away something that is no longer useful to you.

The religious preachers, rather than ridicule it in the name of religion, should rather preach on this life giving gesture.

Let better sense prevail. AMEN !!!

Posted October 18, 2011 by Rajesh_Gandhi in action, happiness, i love you, idea, loved ones, muslim, religion

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Prince Harry & Pippa – the next Royal Couple?   Leave a comment

Will the chemistry between Prince Harry & Pippa Middleton spark enough to turn into the next royal marital bond? Will they be the next “Royal Couple”?

What do you feel?

Royal Honeymoon – William & Kate   Leave a comment

Britain’s newly married Prince William and his wife, the former Kate Middleton, have left the island nation of the Seychelles after a 10-day honeymoon, officials said Saturday.

“They left happy and clearly content with their stay,” said the head of the Seychelles tourism board, Alain St Ange, who saw the couple leave Friday.

William’s office at St. James’s Palace confirmed the couple had returned to Britain.

The palace said the couple “thoroughly enjoyed their time together, and they are grateful to the Seychelles government for their assistance in making the honeymoon such a memorable and special 10 days.”

The island nation’s foreign minister said the nation was proud to host the couple.

“The people of Seychelles are truly honored that Prince William and his wife chose to return to Seychelles for this special holiday and we are proud to have been able to offer them a peaceful and private getaway,” Jean-Paul Adam said in a statement released by the government.

The string of 115 islands in the Indian Ocean about 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) off the eastern coast of Kenya is known for its sandy beaches, clear waters and secluded hideaways.

“We hope their stay was everything they had hoped for and we look forward to welcoming them back to our shores again in the future,” Adam said.

The Seychelles coast guard helped ensure the couple’s privacy as they stayed on North Island. On their last day the royal couple invited the coast guard ashore to personally thank them for their efforts.

North Island in the Seychelles, where the royal newlyweds celebrated their honeymooning, is the paragon of tropical island escapes – the Christian Louboutin of what travel types call barefoot luxury.

At £1,957 per person per night – the average honeymoon for two people costs £3,220 – the stylish resort attracts the super-rich, City whizzkids and A-list celebrities including Liz Hurley, Jennifer Aniston, Pierce Brosnan and JK Rowling. Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are rumoured to have plans to exchange wedding vows on one of its two beaches.

Should you wish to reserve all 11 villas, ensuring privacy rather than paparazzi, the tiny granitic speck washed by the emerald shallows of the Indian Ocean will cost £43,000 – a remarkable flourish to what had been dubbed the austerity wedding.

For the considerable outlay, visitors to the fecund island of three small peaks and two white powder beaches stay in huge two-bedroom, butler-serviced villas of 4,843 square feet (450 sq m) made by Balinese thatchers and Tanzanian wood carvers. They have indoor and outdoor showers, staggeringly large bathrooms and floor-to-ceiling windows opening on to decks with private gazebos and plunge pools. Each villa has an electric golf buggy to nip around the sandy tracks.

At 8,000 square feet, Villa 11 claims to be one of the world’s ultimate beach huts with a circular-flow swimming pool, cinema lounge and multiple levels cascading down the boulders to the sand. The resort’s public areas, designed by the renowned safari camp architects Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens, use upturned sun-bleached takamaka trees to create Daliesque columns for open-sided rooms containing rectangular reflection pools, sunken sofas and screens of roped coral.

The choice of the hyper-fashionable if slightly cliched honeymoon suggests the royal couple not only have a less stuffy idea of romance than his parents but also enjoy a more equal relationship. Charles and Diana’s post-wedding travels in 1981 took in Broadlands in Hampshire, the family home of the Mountbattens, followed by a Mediterranean cruise on the royal yacht and a visit to Balmoral with his family – which suggests Charles called the shots rather than his younger bride. Whether North Island will be such an aphrodisiac is another question. William was born in 1982, eight months after his parents returned.

Royal Wedding Hats collections   Leave a comment

The Royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, was more than a display of pomp.

The ensemble of the hats worn by the ladies to the wedding was another talks of the world.

Check them out below:

A nude wedding   Leave a comment

William and Kate might like to give this idea for their big day a miss.

A couple have turned the other cheek to tradition by getting married – in a naked wedding.

Melanie Schachner, 26, and Rene Schachner, 31, had racked their brains to come up with something so memorable for their big day that they would never forget.

Wedding tackle: Melanie Schachner, 26, and Rene Schachner, 31, stripped off for their wedding in Feldkirchen, Austria, while guests remained clothedWedding tackle: Melanie Schachner, 26, and Rene Schachner, 31, stripped off for their wedding in Feldkirchen, Austria, while guests remained clothed

The groom and not-so-blushing bride decided to strip off and get married in the nude in front of their family and friends.

They walked down the aisle in a register office service in Feldkirchen, Austria, before celebrating with a reception in a nearby castle.

Melanie wore a traditional veil and white high heels. Her breasts were exposed but a flesh-coloured thong covered her nether-regions.

The groom, however, remained totally nude throughout the service, using only a top hat to cover his modesty when posing for wedding pictures.

The cheek of it: The bride walked down the aisle in a traditional veil while the groom only had his top hat to cover his modesty

Thankfully for the couple, the registrar managed to keep her embarrassment under control and make it through the reading of the vows.

Melanie said: ‘We’re not ashamed of our bodies and we wanted to do something different. It certainly saved on a wedding dress.’

In 2009 Australian couple Ellie Barton and Phil Hendicott, who conducted their nuptials in the nude back in 2009.

They won a radio competition which awarded them a free wedding – as long as they both wore nothing at all.

But their 250 wedding guests were allowed clothes.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1376927/Something-old-nude-Groom-blushing-bride-marry-naked-wedding.html#ixzz1JnEUvgCA

The Arab Tsunami   2 comments

The Arab Tsunami started a couple of months before the one that struck Japan. The one in Japan was a natural calamity, but the one in the Arab region was man-made.

Not that the world was unaware to the long simmering across the region. What they did not anticipate was the acceleration and momentum of the rebellion that it created.

Well, the street vendor from Tunisia can be considered as the small wave that started the Arab Tsunami, the repercussions of which were felt across the Arab world.

The Internet, via, FaceBook, Twitter & YouTube just added the much needed support within the timeframe, in order to create that ‘moving’ force.

This rebellion by the populace is against the suppression of the aspirations on civilians, particularly the youth. This suppression is by the government spearheaded by the ruler, be it a monarch or an autocrat; some of which have succumbed to the rebellion demands (some by pressure & some by being extra-charitable overnight), while the defiant still continue to uncomfortable on their “thorny” thrones.

The Arab Tsunami threatens roll some more dictatorial and “possibly” some monarch heads; if they are not flexible enough to accede to the demands of the civilian population. It is a well known fact that during the thunderstorm even the mighty oak falls, but the humble grass stays on.

Hence, there is a desperate need to change the mindset of the Arab rulers, if the region has to survive peacefully and see some radical growth, in line with the world. Just waking up with a philanthropical thought after the catastrophe, is not going to resolve, defuse or bridge the gap between the ruler and the ruled. It has to be inclusive growth in line with the aspirations of all the strata of the society.

Those rulers directly in the “line-of-fire” are doing their bit to assuage the fire; but it a fact that their other peers are not immune to such uprisings.

It is said that Western world is being very selective and disparate in their responses to these uprising Arab Tsunami. They have been blamed for their “double standards” in dealing with such situations from across  the world. They are considering their selfish interests in giving their support to this situation.

The tsunami has already swept across Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, Yemen, Syria, Bahrain, & Libya.

So one may ask, “Who’s next”? Change is inevitable. Its not if, but when?